Skip to main content
Infrastructure Resilience Conference 2018

Full Program »

Operationalizing Resilience for Crisis Management in Critical Infrastructures

The crises critical infrastructures (CI) might face are characterised by high impact, cascading effects, and surprises. These characteristics challenge traditional risk management, requiring approaches that emphasise crises’ systemic nature and low predictability. Horizon 2020 project DARWIN is finalising the development of resilience management guidelines that aim to support CIs in enhancing their resilience in the face of crises. The guidelines support the adoption of new practices as well as of a critical perspective on the processes and tools organisations already implement (e.g., preparation activities, contingency plans), grounded in research and practice on resilience management, especially from the fields of Resilience Engineering and Community Resilience. The project is developing generic guidelines, and pilots them in two domains: air traffic management (ATM), and healthcare. The development and evaluation of the guidelines involves: - Participation of end-user practitioners and experts from ATM, healthcare and other CIs as co-creators throughout the development life-cycle. - Investigation of concepts, practices and tools of resilience management through a review of scientific literature, standards and operational documentation, and through practitioners’ interviews, leading to the identification of requirements capturing capabilities the guidelines should address. - Development of a wiki application to support collaborative development, access and multiple formats. Experimentations to facilitate the guidelines’ implementation and provide a quantitative assessment of resilience through combining serious game exercises and a simplified simulation of the involved systems.The main outcome is a set of guidelines, complemented with an application and formats for access, and training packages. The contribution will reflect on the project’s approach to operationalising resilience concepts and tools, and on the use of advanced capabilities to facilitate their development, evaluation and adoption. These results will inform efforts aimed at further reducing the gap between theoretical or empirical descriptions of resilience and its adoption in critical infrastructure practices.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The research leading to the results received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 653289. Opinions expressed in this publication reflect only the authors' view and that the Agency is not responsible for any use that may be made of the information it contains.

Matthieu Branlat
SINTEF
Norway

Ivonne Herrera
SINTEF
Norway

Per Martin Schachtebeck
Technische Universität Braunschweig
Germany

Peter Förster
Technische Universität Braunschweig
Germany

 

Powered by OpenConf®
Copyright ©2002-2016 Zakon Group LLC